Letters from the Issue of December 7, 2006

"It would be worth it to go to jail for taking his fed-up @$$ off the face of this earth”

O.J.: Pro and Would-Be Con

Nail 'im: Regarding "If We Did It" (November 23): If I saw O.J. Simpson, I'd stab him myself. It would be worth it to go to jail for taking his fed-up @$$ off the face of this earth. I ask myself all the time: What in god's name is this world coming to?

Renée O'Brien
Miami Beach

Let him be: There are a couple of facts everyone seems to forget about O.J. First, his SUV never moved from its parking place the night of the murders. Didn't anyone remember the first witness at the trial? Second, Mr. Simpson was acquitted by a jury of his peers. Third, O.J.'s ex-wife allegedly had oral sex with his best friend in front of his children. She deserved what she got.

Johnny Ellis
Irving, Texas


Paddle to Fame

But get your life jacket: "Surf, Reggae, Roll" (November 30) by Julienne Gage was a great piece about a fine band with two exceptional people and musicians. I had the pleasure of performing with Kayak Man for much of 2005 and loved every minute of it.

Tato and Nano are the Argentine reggae-roll Lennon/McCartney. The music flows from them like water in a spring; timeless, calm, melodic.

It's about time Kayak Man gets a serious writeup and the "respek" it deserves.

Ricardo Mazzi, member of Tereso
Miami


R.I.P., Sammy Render

Journalists stink: I read about Casimir Wrobel, a suspect in the hit-and-run death of Sammy Render, in Francisco Alvarado's story "Crash Dummies" (November 2). It's appalling that someone would drink himself into oblivion, get behind the wheel, run into a human being, and continue for two miles until pulled over by a cop and then claim he thought he hit a dog. But it upsets me even more to see how Mr. Alvarado highlighted Wrobel's demise. What is this, a pity party? He got fired from ADT! He can't see his kids! He hasn't paid his $1000-a-month child support! Who cares?! Where is the compassion and sympathy for the real victim and his family?

Nothing is stated about Samuel Render except he was a resident of your city, was pedaling his bike, and is a Vietnam vet. What about his family? Ohhh, I get it, there was no information available prior to this story being printed. Did anyone do the research to discover anything about him or his family? Does anyone know his family and if he has any surviving children? Has anyone made any attempts to interview his family, not just friends who roomed with or grew up with him?

Has anyone inquired as to where Wrobel had been in that company van to get so drunk? Hmmm, is the establishment he was patronizing being protected because they continued feeding him alcohol instead of cutting him off ... and now they could potentially be liable for contributing to this incident? I trust New Times is staffed by some halfway decent investigative reporters who could've gotten the answers to these and many other questions. I was pretty upset when I read this story because all I could think about is: How would I feel if that was a member of my family? How would you feel if that was someone in your family?

Larry Lynch
Las Vegas, Nevada

Drunk drivers stink: I do not want to sound insensitive toward the victims in Francisco Alvarado's story "Crash Dummies." Saying that a tragedy has happened to them and their families is an understatement. I do, however, want to point out that the accidents brought up in the article were mostly caused by drunk or careless drivers. I am a true believer that Miami pedestrians are the worst in the country. We do not look both ways when crossing, we jump out in front of cars, we ignore the "do not walk" signs. Stand on SW Eighth Street for fifteen minutes, and you will see all of these and more rules broken by pedestrians. In order to help solve this problem, we must not blame just one side; we need to educate both the driver and pedestrian. We need to learn how to respect each other's right of way.

Name withheld by request
Miami

Sammy's with God: My cousin sent me Francisco Alvarado's article regarding my uncle's death, "Crash Dummies." I cried, got angry all over again, yet I could not feel any sympathy for the man who hit my uncle. My uncle was not a dog, and if the man had not been drunk, maybe he would have known that.

Uncle Sammy Render was the baby in the family, and I am glad my grandparents are not alive to feel the pain and loss my family has suffered. I am glad they are not here to hear how little my uncle's life meant to anyone. I am glad they did not have to see another son murdered.

The next time you write an article about my uncle, please express that he had a family who loved him and misses him. He was not a dog! He was a disabled vet who served his country just like the offender did.

Daphne Jones
Palo Alto, California


Maya, Maya

Who'd have guessed?: In reference to Carlos Suarez De Jesus's story "Maya, How You Haven't Changed" (November 2): The title of this article gives the impression that Mayan people are stuck in some ancient past and have not progressed like those people we consider modern. Nothing could be further from the truth. The Maya are both modern and traditional like all of us. And their weaving has changed. Mayan weavers have been enthusiastic about the rich colors available through aniline-dyed threads, for example.

Marvin Cohodas
Vancouver, British Columbia


Corrections

An item titled "Rockstar Righteous" in the November 23 "Wrappin'" guide improperly identified the designer of a line of jewelry at J.W. Cooper in the Bal Harbour Shops. He is Bon Jovi drummer Tico Torres. A story called "Velvet Gold Mine" in the November 30 issue mischaracterized an appearance by the New York Dolls. Two band members will DJ at performances this week; they will not appear at Churchill's. (See the item about Silvain Silvain and Sam Yaffa in this issue's Livewire.)

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