Toni Turns to China

Yeung-chow fried rice wasn't exactly exemplary either, the insipidly seasoned grain blanketed by a bland assemblage of shrimp, ham, roast pork, peas, and pieces of scrambled egg. Curried coconut chicken in a hot clay pot was moist and mildly piquant but bereft of high notes that could lift it from its one-dimensionality. Chow fun was more successful, the wide noodles slippery, but not greasy, and interspersed with tender slices of beef and an assertive black bean sauce. Bok choy sautéed with garlic was appealing too, but $10 is a lot to fork over for a side plate of greens.

Prices here tend to total up quickly, so it might be worthwhile to order Mr. Chu's prix fixe menu. Prepared for a minimum of two people and starting at $50 per head, the meal boasts numerous courses and specialty items. It is hoped the prix fixe dessert selections are more interesting than the regular menu's short list of Americanized sweets -- chocolate volcano, macadamia-caramel tart, et cetera.

Although the history of Chinese-American restaurants continues to be written, it's doubtful Toni's new establishment will ever be billed as one of the best. Still, in this era of limited Chinese options, you could do worse than to choose Chu's.

Mr. Chu's incorporates fun favorites and exotic 
Chinese delicacies
Jonathan Postal
Mr. Chu's incorporates fun favorites and exotic Chinese delicacies

« Previous Page
 |
 
1
 
2
 
All
 
My Voice Nation Help
0 comments
Sort: Newest | Oldest
 
Loading...