Pascal Oudin

Personal Best

PASCAL OUDIN

PASCALS ON PONCE, 2611 Ponce de Leon Boulevard, Coral Gables 305-444-2024

At the tender age of seventeen Pascal Oudin won France's "Best Apprentice Chef Award," a coveted distinction that launched the youngster into the kitchens of masters such as Alain Ducasse and Roger Verge. By the time he arrived here in 1984, Oudin himself was something of a master. Hotel restaurants became a specialty: Dominique's, the Colonnade, Grand Café at the Grand Bay Hotel. Along the way he attracted national attention. In 1995 Food & Wine named him one of America's "Best New Chefs." Esquire piled on with "Best New Chef in Florida." After he finally opened his own restaurant in Coral Gables, Pascal's on Ponce, it didn't take long for the awards to begin arriving. Besides many local accolades (including our own Best New Restaurant), Esquire again paid a visit and declared Oudin's namesake to be the "Best New Restaurant in America for 2000."

BEST MONTH

February. The weather and the romance of Valentine's Day. There is no better time of the year.

BEST PLACE FOR FRESH VEGETABLES

Norman Brothers.

BEST CHEAP THRILL

A ride on the Metromover is a great minitour of downtown Miami and Brickell. And for just 25 cents.

BEST NOT-SO-CHEAP THRILL

Skydive Sebastian in Sebastian, Florida. 1-800-399-JUMP (www.skydiveseb.com).

BEST RESTAURANT TO DIE IN THE PAST 12 MONTHS

Wolfie's. An institution is gone.

BEST DINING TREND

Cheese. It's been enjoyed for centuries with wine and fruit. Always classy.

BEST REASON TO LIVE IN MIAMI

Tropical weather all year round. This makes the style of living very easy and comfortable. Miami and Miami Beach attract tourists, which is great for businesses of all types all year. South Florida living is affordable compared to other large cities like New York or San Francisco, including housing. Plus, due to the mix of people from different cultures, this city is the perfect place to start a venture of any kind.

RECIPE

SAUTÉED ESCALOPES OF FOIE GRAS WITH HUCKLEBERRY GASTRIC

Serves 6

1 whole fresh uncooked duck foie gras (Grade A; about 1 pound)

Fine sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

1/3 cup light brown sugar

1 1/2 cups fresh huckleberries (about 8 ounces)

1 tablespoon chopped shallots

1/2 cup balsamic vinegar

1 cup fond de veau (veal stock)

1/2 cup port wine

1 tablespoon butter

To prepare the foie gras:

Separate the foie gras lobes by cutting the connecting tendon with a very sharp knife. For six people you will only need the larger lobe, so reserve the remaining lobe for pâté or mousse. Carefully remove all veins but do not smash liver. Pat it dry. Place lobe flat on a cool, clean surface and, using a sharp knife dipped into very hot water, cut at a slight angle to make a 5/8 to 3/4 inch-thick slice of foie gras weighing about 3 ounces. Continue cutting until you have 6 pieces of equal size, dipping the knife into very hot water each time you slice. Lay pieces flat and with the tip of the knife, cut a crosshatch design 1/8 inch deep across the top of each piece. Cover and refrigerate until ready to sear.

Preheat oven to 275 F. Place a 10-inch nonstick sauté pan over high heat. Do not oil pan! Remove foie gras from refrigerator. Season both sides with salt and pepper. When the pan is very hot, add the foie gras, scored side down. Using your fingertips, gently push slices into pan so that foie gras immediately begins to render its fat. Cook for about 2 minutes, or until bottom begins to caramelize and quite a bit of fat has been exuded. Turn and brown on the other side for 2 minutes or until well crisped. Remove cooked foie gras to a warm plate and keep warm.

To start the sauce:

Place the sugar and the butter in a heavy 4-quart saucepan and cook over high heat until a rich caramel color, 3 to 4 minutes, stirring almost constantly with a wooden spoon; be careful not to let it burn. Add 1 cup of the huckleberries, stirring until berries are well coated, then promptly add the shallots; cook until mixture reduces to about 1 cup, about 15 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the balsamic vinegar and reduce back to a syrup consistency. Add the fond de veau and the port wine and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer about 7 minutes, stirring occasionally. Remove from heat and strain through chinois, using the bottom of a sturdy ladle to force as much through as possible; the strained sauce should yield about 1 1/4 cups. Add the remaining 1/2 cup huckleberries and season with salt and pepper to taste. Return to saucepan and keep warm.

To serve:

Spoon 2 to 3 tablespoons sauce on each heated serving plate; arrange a slice of foie gras on top of sauce and serve hot.

 
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