Drive, He Said

Fundamental philosophy from righteous Rastaman Screwdriver

Screwdriver isn't apologizing for the proselytizing. "The whole world today remains in danger!" he implores. "O.A.U." skillfully presents his advocacy of the Organization of African Unity, pointing out that all black people, whether Jamaican, Nigerian, or Trinidadian, are descended from Ethiopians. "That's one of the most important things that black people could ever have, but they don't know. The black race has no federation to represent them, and the African continent will not know peace until they have one leadership. Organize and centralize is the number one solution to the black people's problems of today."

On the other side of the fundamentalist coin is the track "Woman's World," which claims heroin addiction as one possible side effect of consorting with the distaff side.

Admitting that his female backup singers raised eyebrows when asked to sing along with "Stand up strong/Don't let them conquer you," Screwdriver says the song is simply about one misunderstanding that cost a man his life because of "the bitter side of a lady."

"Today I see women doing a man's job," he says, a sour scowl indicating his displeasure. "I don't think women should wear pants. Or man a dress."

That image sets off the jitters, and he spins his bottle of Vigotron on the table and drops his car keys to the ground. Mysticism, ancestral traditions, and scripture are topics more likely to provide Screwdriver with a true tonic.

"A Rastaman is someone who fights for equal rights -- not in a physical form, but with wisdom and knowledge and understanding. That's why I choose to do right. I want to be Godlike. Not Devil-like."

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