Here's Cooking at You

Moroccan Nights

Service was attentive on one visit, less so on another, but always cordial. The waiters certainly pour tea better than anyone else, the silver pot held high in the air, the steamy liquid falling in a skinny stream smack into little glasses held on a tray below. The tea, made from fresh mint leaves, was sugary; desserts were sweet in a honey-laden, baklava-type way. If that's not your preferred style of pastry, a plate of fresh oranges with cinnamon and sugar ($6.95) should do.

African spice and much more that's nice at Moroccan Nights
Steve Satterwhite
African spice and much more that's nice at Moroccan Nights

Tea-pouring has its dramatic value, but the main entertainment is belly dancing, 25-minute shows beginning nightly between 9:00 and 10:00. To be honest the notion of a flabby belly oscillating over my couscous has never had the effect of whetting my appetite, but while the dancers change from night to night, some no doubt better than others, the ones we caught were entertaining in an Americanized, girl-next-door sort of way. Authentic? Probably not, but Moroccan Nights provides a uniquely satisfying dining experience and has maintained integrity while translating its foreign cuisine for Miamian tastes. That's as much as anyone should ask for.

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