Letters

Erratum
Owing to an editing error in "Dumb and Dumber Luck" (February 4), about lottery winner Bernardo Paz, attorney George Garcia's plea to charges of aggravated assault and witness tampering was stated incorrectly. Garcia pleaded no contest. New Times regrets the error.

What a Relief: Only Two Errors!
Thanks for Kirk Nielsen's great article on the preservation battle over Ransom Everglades School's Band Cottage ("Cottage Beaten, Held for Ransom," January 28). In my reading, I spotted only two errors: 1) In 1994 the school's master plan did not call for moving and repairing the cottage. The widely held assumption was that it would be demolished. This is what spurred our alumni group to action. 2) I believe my comment about the "fucking roof" being removed was made off the record. I would not want to leave the school's students with the impression that I use such language so candidly.

David Villano
Coconut Grove

Kirk Nielsen replies: I never mentioned a 1994 master plan. In that year, however, the school's trustees created a "wish list" that included moving the cottage and repairing it.

I regret any misunderstanding about what was on or off the record.

Pirate Radio: Our Last Best Hope
I am writing regarding Kirk Nielsen's "A Pirate's Mutiny" (January 28). My favorite pirate station, at 91.7 FM, has been off the air (as far as I know) for the past year. It broadcast pop and folk music without interruption, and was the only station I've heard that played Dylan's original "Desolation Row" -- all eleven minutes of it.

Hey, pirates! How 'bout a 24/7 folk broadcast? God knows it'll only happen with those who care enough about the product to fund it themselves and to keep it pure. Even public radio is big business now, and as such has lost touch. If only government-sanctioned radio and TV stations could have the purity, freedom, and enthusiasm of the pirates.

I'm pleased that some people are beginning to understand that the airwaves don't really belong to the people; they belong to the government and those who do business with it, not to you and me. They most certainly do not belong to anyone offering a free alternative, no matter how unobtrusive his broadcast signal may be.

It seems there isn't much difference in control tactics between capitalists and socialists when it comes to policing the airwaves. When they feel threatened, the powerful lash out; and unregulated, noncommercial radio is a definite threat to our current fiscal and political arrangement. Let's face it, who would choose to suffer through commercials, pledge drives, and obnoxious disc jockeys if he or she could get the same (or better) programming without interruptions? As always, the status quo could use some competition.

I guess the future lies in radio on the Internet. But how many people can afford computers? Maybe Internet signals could be downloaded to regional pirates and therefore reach a wider audience.

Perhaps there could be underground funding for the promotion of clandestine broadcasts. Or would that doom the whole thing? On second thought, the pirates seem to make it on their own just fine.

Pirate radio may be our last hope for cultural independence.
David Melvin Thornburgh
Miami Beach

Pirate Radio: Get Thee to the Internet
Pirate radio stations have been on the air in Miami since the days of Luther Campbell and the ghetto-style DJs in the Eighties. Maybe the pirates should consider the Internet, which is unregulated. They could include video along with their music.

If anyone is interested, I can be e-mailed at webmaster@MIAMICHOCOLATECITY.COM.

KENDRICK MILLS
MIAMI

Allison on Nina on Amy
AFTER HEARING NINA KORMAN'S NAME ANNOUNCED DURING AMY CAROL WEBB'S PERFORMANCE AT THE BARNACLE STATE HISTORICAL SITE ON JANUARY 31, I WAS INCLINED TO READ HER ARTICLE "A TUNE OF HER OWN" (JANUARY 28). I HAVE KNOWN AMY FOR SEVERAL YEARS AND EVEN I WAS AMAZED AT SOME OF THE TOPICS MS. KORMAN INCLUDED IN HER ARTICLE. IT WAS TRULY INFORMATIVE, AND I AM SURE IT GAVE ALL OF US SONGWEAVER FANS INSIGHT INTO AMY.

AS MS. KORMAN MENTIONED, AMY IS TRULY GIFTED IN THE WAY SHE REACHES HER AUDIENCES, WHETHER IT BE HUMOROUSLY OR PROFOUNDLY. I THANK HER AND NEW TIMES FOR THEIR INTEREST AND TIME WELL SPENT IN COVERING THIS AMAZING WOMAN.

ALLISON TINNEY
MIAMI

A Reader with Way Too Much Time on Her Hands
I think Ted B. Kissell's article on Marilyn Manson ("Marilyn Manson: The Early Years," January 21) was the best I have ever read, and I have read a lot of them. I think Ted did a very good job, and seemed to really know what he was talking about, unlike the authors of other articles I have read. That's all I wanted to say.

Laurel Ramage
Woodbridge, Ontario
Canada

Another Reader with Not Enough to Do
I'm a huge fan of Marilyn Manson but I still have to say Ted B. Kissell's article was very good. I enjoyed it from beginning to end.

Josh Stewart
San Francisco, CA

Impaled Reader Dupe but Happy
Just for the record, we Marilyn Manson fans know we're being duped. The guy's work is metaphorical and therefore is lost on a lot of granola and trail-mix roots-rocker hacks.

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